Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Shad Roe

I created this post on March 28th and have yet to post because I can't figure out how to get the pictures off of my camera...grrrr. So I'm publishing this post in it's out-of-date format because I have to share, even if they aren't available in-store anymore. In attempt to give you the full feel of this delicious dish I borrowed pictures from fellow bloggers whose photos look very much like mine. Please check out their blogs so I don't feel guilty for sourcing :)
Photo courtesy of One Vanilla Bean
Last week the fish section in my grocery store was selling something very scary/interesting- shad roe. While I had no clue what to do with it, I knew I had to buy it!
Photo courtesy of Southern Gastro
After doing some Googling, I discovered that shad are a herring type salt water fish that spawn in fresh water at the start of spring. The roe is a prized delicacy and their appearance in markets signals the start of spring! The recommended cooking method is to gently saute because the sacs of roe can easily burst, not only burning you but splattering your kitchen with grease and fish eggs (yuk) Referring to a Washingtonian.com recipe, I chose to do a simple caper, butter sauce and serve with toast (like a pate).
I separated the two sacks and dredged in milk, then flour. I heated up canola oil and butter in a saute pan over medium heat and cooked for three minutes on one side, then flipped and placed in a 350 degree oven for 5 minutes. As a WARNING, even if you are being careful, some of the sacks will still burst and splatter (think bacon grease burn). To avoid a splatter burn, hold a lid over the pan when you are handling the roe.
Once the roe were firm to the touch I removed and kept warm, then added capers, S&P and milk to the pan, whisking well until combined. I poured this over the roe and served alongside a squeeze of lemon, roasted red onion and garlic toast.
This was absolutely delicious! It had the texture somewhere between sausage and pate, and had a meaty, rich flavor. It tasted more like sausage then fish, only revealing it's identity with a slightly fishy (in a good way) flavor at the back of your palate.

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